Art design

An ‘Architectural Digest’ image omitted the Khmer relics

Photo-Illustration: Lined. Original photo: Douglas Friedman

Fashion is most criticized for its Photoshop failures: Airbrush armpitsa appendix addedand awkwardly widened thigh gaps are just a few examples. But the latest retouching incident to draw attention concerns the world of interior design – in this case, antique images stolen from Cambodia.

A recent washington Job story examined the removal of Khmer relics from a Architectural Summary image of a San Francisco mansion. The missing artwork, Cambodian investigators say, could be stolen relics and part of a larger collection that could include some of the country’s 10 most looted artifacts. As investigators discovered, an image of the court published online in December 2020 and in to print in January 2021 of the residence of billionaires Sloan Lindemann Barnett and Roger Barnett was identical to that which appeared on the architect Pierre Marin’s website until July — except for the removal of the sculptures. The Cambodian government believes the statues – which once belonged to Lindemann Barnett’s parents – have been looted from a sacred site and wants them returned. After Washington Job contacted Marino for comment, the image has been removed from his website. A Architectural Summary spokesperson told the Job that the sculptures were removed due to “unresolved publishing rights around selected artwork”. (Condé Nast, Architectural SummaryCurbed’s editor, did not return Curbed’s requests for comment.)

Cambodian investigators are looking for Khmer relics looted from sacred sites. They spotted a few in a photograph of a San Francisco mansion renovated by Peter Marino when it appeared on his website (left) and noticed they had been removed when the image was posted in Architectural Summary (right). From left to right : Photo: Douglas FriedmanPhoto: Douglas Friedman

Cambodian investigators are looking for Khmer relics looted from sacred sites. They spotted a few of them in a photo of a San Francisco mansion…
Cambodian investigators are looking for Khmer relics looted from sacred sites. They spotted a few in a photograph of a San Francisco mansion renovated by Peter Marino when it appeared on his website (left) and noticed they had been removed when the image was posted in Architectural Summary (right). From above: Photo: Douglas FriedmanPhoto: Douglas Friedman

The practice of digitally removing objects from interior images is common. Designers and architects are asking photographers to remove light switches and furniture, alter the landscape visible through windows, and clean up text from books, among many other tweaks. People who let design magazines into their residences frequently request that certain valuables, personal items, or house numbers not appear due to privacy concerns. and publications will remove images of works of art belonging to galleries, museums or other cultural institutions. But in this case, the dispute appears to be less about publication rights and more about disputed ownership.

Cambodian investigators looked at the Lindemann family art collection for a while – even before learning about the retouched photo. The same statues appeared in a 2008 Architectural Summary story about the $68.5 million family home in Palm Beach, which featured about $40 million worth of Khmer antiques. (The previous article described the collection as “one of Southeast Asia’s largest art collections in private hands.”) Two people working on the investigation told the Washington Job that it is ongoing, and although the Lindeman family members have not been charged with wrongdoing, they would not return the coins to Cambodia.

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